ScanEagle

ScanEagle is launched from the flight deck of HMAS Newcastle in the Middle East region.
Type
Unmanned Aerial System
Status
Operation evaluation
Manufacturer
Boeing Insitu
Role
  • Long-endurance ISR
  • Communication relay
  • Combat search
  • Electronic attack
  • Target designation
  • Hyperspectral analysis
  • Ocean mapping
Launch and Recovery
Pneumatic catapault launcher and Skyhook recovery system
Origin
USA
Length
1.55-1.71 metres (depending on sensors fitted)
Wingspan
3.11 metres
Weights
  • 22 kilograms (max takeoff)
  • 3.4 kilograms (max payload)
Speed
  • 80 knots (max)
  • 55 knots (cruise)
Range
100 kilometres
Endurance +24 hours
Altitude 15,000 feet (max)
Crew
2 (Mission Commander and audio-visual/payload operator)
Engines 1 x two-stroke, heavy fuel engine
Sensors Video detection and ranging camera
Ships embarked in HMAS Newcastle
Resources
News Articles

ScanEagle unmanned aerial system is a fixed wing, catapult-launched aircraft boasting interchangeable optical surveillance cameras and a passive search visual detection and ranging that uses image pixel comparison to find targets. The system has undergone sea trials and has also been flown from a land station on Christmas Island.

A ScanEagle unmmanned aerial vehicle launches from the flight deck of HMAS Newcastle during operational evaluation trials.
A ScanEagle unmmanned aerial vehicle launches from the flight deck of HMAS Newcastle during operational evaluation trials.

To support the introduction of Maritime Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems, ScanEagle conducted the Royal Australian Navy’s first simultaneous operations of manned (MH-60R Seahawk) and unmanned aircraft during HMAS Newcastle's recent deployment (Rotation 65) to the Middle East region on Operation MANITOU.

Able Seaman Aviation Technician Aircraft Daniel Debritt (left) powers up the ScanEagle propeller during unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV) during flying stations onboard HMAS Newcastle in the Middle East region.
Able Seaman Aviation Technician Aircraft Daniel Debritt (left) powers up the ScanEagle propeller during unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV) during flying stations onboard HMAS Newcastle in the Middle East region.