HMAS
Sydney
(II) - Part 5

Pennant
D48
Commissioned
24/09/1935
Decommissioned
19/11/1941

HMAS Sydney (II) Wreck Investigation

Ship's Crane

Sydney's seaplane crane visible mounted immediately behind her forward funnel. The crane's jib is in the raised position
Sydney's seaplane crane visible mounted immediately behind her forward funnel. The crane's jib is in the raised position
Two views of the main part of the seaplane crane which remains in situ on Sydney's wreck. The jib has detached and now lies on the main deck on the starboard side of the cruiser.
Two views of the main part of the seaplane crane which remains in situ on Sydney's wreck. The jib has detached and now lies on the main deck on the starboard side of the cruiser.
The lattice work jib of Sydney's distinctive seaplane. The crane was used to recover the amphibian aircraft and also the large ships boats.
The lattice work jib of Sydney's distinctive seaplane crane. The crane was used to recover the amphibian aircraft and also the large ships boats.
Left: Sydney's seaplane crane in the stowed position on the starboard side of the aircraft catapault. Right: The arrow in this image indicates the forward part of the crane's jib lying behind the starboard, aft, boat cradle
Left: Sydney's seaplane crane in the stowed position on the starboard side of the aircraft catapault. Right: The arrow in this image indicates the forward part of the crane's jib lying behind the starboard, aft, boat cradle

Ship's Catapault

Left: Sydney's Seagull amphibian aircraft secured on its catapault. Right: When Sydney sank the catapault separated from the 'round-house' on which it was mounted coming to rest in the ship's debris field.
Left: Sydney's Seagull amphibian aircraft secured on its catapault. Right: When Sydney sank the catapault separated from the 'round-house' on which it was mounted coming to rest in the ship's debris field.
Left: Another view of Sydney's aircraft secured on its catapault amidships. Right: The top of the 'round-house' on which the catapault was normally mounted.
Left: Another view of Sydney's aircraft secured on its catapault amidships. Right: The top of the 'round-house' on which the catapault was normally mounted.

4-inch Gun Deck

Left: Sydney's port, forward 4-inch gun (designated P1) being served by its gun's crew. Right: P1 in situ on Sydney's wreck. The 4-inch gun deck showed signs of heavy damage as is evident in this image.
Left: Sydney's port, forward 4-inch gun (designated P1) being served by its gun's crew. Right: P1 in situ on Sydney's wreck. The 4-inch gun deck showed signs of heavy damage as is evident in this image.
Left: The remains of ready-use 4-inch ammunition lockers on Sydney's gun deck. Right: The port, aft 4-inch gun (designated P2) as it is today.
Left: The remains of ready-use 4-inch ammunition lockers on Sydney's gun deck. Right: The port, aft 4-inch gun (designated P2) as it is today.
Left: A view looking forward from the rear of the starboard 4-inch gun deck: The guns on this deck were designated S1 (forward) and S2 (aft) respectively. S1 separated from Sydney when she sank and now lies inverted on the seabed in the debris field.
Left: A view looking forward from the rear of the starboard 4-inch gun deck: The guns on this deck were designated S1 (forward) and S2 (aft) respectively. S1 separated from Sydney when she sank and now lies inverted on the seabed in the debris field.
Left: In July 1940 Sydney's shipwrights secured 3/8-inch steel plate to the guardrails surrounding the 4-inch gun deck in an effort to provide guns crews with a measure of protection. Right: Gun 'S2' in situ at the aft end of the gun deck. Beneath its gun barrel can be seen remnants of portions of the 3/8-inch plate seen being fitted at left.
Left: In July 1940 Sydney's shipwrights secured 3/8-inch steel plate to the guardrails surrounding the 4-inch gun deck in an effort to provide guns crews with a measure of protection. Right: Gun 'S2' in situ at the aft end of the gun deck. Beneath its gun barrel can be seen remnants of portions of the 3/8-inch plate seen being fitted at left.

Torpedo Tubes

Left: Sydney's starboard Mk VII quadruple torpedo tubes in situ beneath the 4-inch gun deck. Right: The torpedo mount separated from the ship when it sank leaving the 'ring' gear on which it once sat visible on the main wreck.
Left: Sydney's starboard Mk VII quadruple torpedo tubes in situ beneath the 4-inch gun deck. Right: The torpedo mount separated from the ship when it sank leaving the 'ring' gear on which it once sat visible on the main wreck.
The upturned torpedo mount lying in the debris field with several torpedoes still in place with firing pistols fitted..
The upturned torpedo mount lying in the debris field with several torpedoes still in place with firing pistols fitted..
Left: Sydney's port torpedo tubes visible mounted beneath the 4-inch gun deck. Right: As with the starboard mount, the port torpedo tubes also separated from the ship when it sank.
Left: Sydney's port torpedo tubes visible mounted beneath the 4-inch gun deck. Right: As with the starboard mount, the port torpedo tubes also separated from the ship when it sank.
The port torpedo mount lying inverted in remarkably good condition in the debris field. A brass tally attached to the Mk VII QR mount is still legible and can be easily read
The port torpedo mount lying inverted in remarkably good condition in the debris field. A brass tally attached to the Mk VII QR mount is still legible and can be easily read
Left: The plans for the port Mk VII QR torpedo mount reveal that each individual tube was assigned a unique alphabetical designation - 'F' 'I' 'R' or 'E'. Right: Visible on the caps of the two closest tubes can be seen the letters 'E' and 'R' confirming them as being part of the port torpedo battery.
Left: The plans for the port Mk VII QR torpedo mount reveal that each individual tube was assigned a unique alphabetical designation - 'F' 'I' 'R' or 'E'. Right: Visible on the caps of the two closest tubes can be seen the letters 'E' and 'R' confirming them as being part of the port torpedo battery.

Aft Control Position and Search Light Platform

Sydney's aft control station and searchlight platform were both mounted immediately forward of 'X' gun turret as can be seen here. Note also the distinctive officer's galley smoke stack similar to the letter 'H' in appearance.
Sydney's aft control station and searchlight platform were both mounted immediately forward of 'X' gun turret as can be seen here. Note also the distinctive officer's galley smoke stack similar to the letter 'H' in appearance.
The aft searchlight platform lying inverted in the debris field. Note its distinctive lattice structure
The aft searchlight platform lying inverted in the debris field. Note its distinctive lattice structure
Left: One of the smoke stack that was once situated in the vicinity of the after searchlight platform lying in silt in the debris field. Middle: The lattice work support of the searchlight platform. Right: The remains of the aft control station lying on its side in the debris field.
Left: One of the officer's galley smoke stacks that was once situated in the vicinity of the after searchlight platform lying in silt in the debris field. Middle: The lattice work support of the searchlight platform. Right: The remains of the aft control station lying on its side in the debris field.

X & Y Turrets

A view looking forward of Sydney's two aft 6-inch guns. In the foreground stands Lieutenant Commander R.D. Handcock (left) one of Sydney's engineering officers. Behind him members of Sydney's band can be seen practising.
A view looking forward of Sydney's two aft 6-inch guns. In the foreground stands Lieutenant Commander R.D. Handcock (left) one of Sydney's engineering officers. Behind him, members of Sydney's band can be seen practising.
Sydney's 'X' gun turret, distinguishable by the distinctive rail that was attached to its side armour. When the quarterdeck awning was spread it was secured to this rail, fitting snuggly against the turret. 'X' turret showed signs of severe damage as a result of the action with Kormoran
Sydney's 'X' gun turret, distinguishable by the distinctive rail that was attached to its side armour. When the quarterdeck awning was spread it was secured to this rail, fitting snuggly against the turret. 'X' turret showed signs of severe damage as a result of the action with Kormoran. Seen here is the rear of the turret with the hatches open.
'X' turret as viewed from the port quarter of Sydney's wreck. The turret is trained as far forward as possible with its sighting ports open. This suggests that the turret was in local control and manually trained forward as Sydney lost weigh and slowly dropped astern of Kormoran.
'X' turret as viewed by the ROV from the port quarter of Sydney's wreck. The turret is trained as far forward as possible with its sighting ports open. This suggests that the turret was in local control and manually trained forward as Sydney lost weigh and slowly dropped astern of Kormoran.
Sydney's aft 6-inch mount was designated 'Y' turret. It too is trained forward at approximately 45 degrees. The remains of Sydney's forward funnel are entagled on its armoured deck-head (roof).
Sydney's aft 6-inch mount was designated 'Y' turret. It too is trained forward at approximately 45 degrees. The remains of Sydney's forward funnel are entagled on its armoured deck-head (roof).

Quarterdeck

In this view of Sydney's quarterdeck can be seen several cylindrical smoke generators mounted vertically on her stern. To the right of them can be seen a depth charge rack holding several cylindrical charges mounted horizontally.
In this view of Sydney's quarterdeck can be seen a depth charge rack holding several cylindrical charges mounted horizontally.
A fine view of Sydney's quarterdeck with a number of distinctive features such as bollards and a captstain visible. Right: These same features appear on this view of Sydney's quarterdeck which has long since imploded, most likely due to a weakend state and the pressure at a depth of more than two kilometres.
A fine view of Sydney's quarterdeck with a number of distinctive features such as bollards, vents and a captstain visible. Right: These same features appear on this view of Sydney's quarterdeck which has long since imploded, most likely due to a weakend state and the pressure of the water at a depth of more than two kilometres.
Another view of Sydney's quarterdeck with smoke generators clearly visible. Right: One of Sydney's smoke generators lying in silt in the debris field
Another view of Sydney's quarterdeck with Carley floats in the foreground and vertical, cylindrical smoke generators clearly visible. Right: One of Sydney's smoke generators lying in silt in the debris field
Sydney's depth charge rack with charges still in place lying inverted in the debris field astern of the main wreck
Sydney's depth charge rack, with charges still in place, lying inverted in the debris field astern of the main wreck
Ratings scrubbing the quarterdeck in happier times. Right: The imploded quarter deck as it rests today
Ratings scrubbing the quarterdeck in happier times. Right: The imploded quarter deck as it rests today
HMAS Sydney as depicted by, and used with permission of marine artist, John Ford.
HMAS Sydney as depicted by, and used with permission of marine artist, John Ford.