Reserve Entry Officers' Course

Trainees waiting for next Leadership exercise.
Trainees waiting for next Leadership exercise.

The Reserve Entry Officers' Course (REOC) consists of an initial two-week residential component followed by a series of residential and distance learning modules completed as time permits. As candidates are generally already qualified in their chosen field, the focus of this course is to teach you the fundamental skills required of a naval officer.

Your initial two-week residential component is conducted at the Royal Australian Naval College (RANC), HMAS Creswell.

Creswell is located alongside Jervis Bay surrounded by the Booderee National Park, Jervis Bay, while officially a part of the Australian Capital Territory, is located three hours south of Sydney, on the New South Wales South Coast.

The REOC course is derived from the New Entry Officers' Course (NEOC) and therefore possesses many of the same challenges.

Given the unique nature of Reserve Service, you will complete the remaining NEOC components via distance learning and a series of two-week residential modules. The initial module at the RANC is the equivalent to a condensed version of the NEOC Initial Training Period and is designed to teach you the basics of how to be a Naval Officer.

Training Summary

Reserve Entry Officers' Course members.
Reserve Entry Officers' Course members.

Administration

This time is set aside to conduct a large variety of miscellaneous tasks. These include, but are not limited to, attending medicals, uniform issue, social functions and paperwork.

Officers conducting a brief.
Officers conducting a brief.

Communications

These lessons will teach you how to communicate both orally and verbally within the military. You will learn how to use standard templates for written material as well as the format expected when presenting a verbal military brief. This is an important module, because, as an officer, you will be expected to be a proficient communicator.

Division mustering.
Division mustering.

Divisional System

The Divisional System within the RAN is designed to facilitate the effective everyday management of its personnel. You will receive formal lessons on how the Divisional System is applied throughout the RAN and a brief introduction to the role of the Divisional Officer (DO).

Male and Female officer conversing.
Male and Female officer conversing.

Equity & Diversity Awareness

Being an equal opportunity employer, the RAN requires all it's members to undergo Equity and Diversity (E&D) training. On this course you will learn the various ADF and Navy policies in regard to E&D. You will also learn about the Equity Adviser Network, which exists to aid people in resolving E&D issues.

Leadership in the field.
Leadership in the field.

Leadership

As an officer in the Royal Australian Naval Reserve, it is your job to lead your sailors and set the example as to how they should behave. Here at the RANC, you will receive lessons on leadership theory and methods of practical leadership. This will include learning how to apply the Navy's military leadership model to various situations, as well as receiving opportunities to develop your own leadership potential through a practical exercise known as Coral Sea.

Officers practicing with the 9mm pistol.
Officers practicing with the 9mm pistol.

9mm Pistol Course

This course is run over two days, with the first day spent learning how to correctly handle the weapon, it's firing procedures and finally a test on what you have learnt. On the second day you will apply these skills in a practical range shoot at the Beecroft Range Facility at Point Perpendicular. You will be required to achieve a score of at least 64 out of 80 to successfully pass this shoot.

Equipment being moved with a jackstay.
Equipment being moved with a jackstay.

OHS and Risk Management Induction

The RAN takes very seriously its responsibility to provide a safe working environment. During this course, you will learn the principles of Occupational Health and Safety and how they uniquely apply within the RAN.

The Pixley cup.
The Pixley cup.

Physical Training

You will learn to love the time you spend with the Physical Training Instructors (PTIs). The PTIs will help you to raise your fitness to a level where you can complete any of the tasks asked of you whilst in training both here at the College and on subsequent courses. PT includes what is known as Early Morning Activities (EMA), which is conducted at 0545h every second day. EMA activities include running, circuit training and pack marches, to name a few.

Three Huon Class Mine Hunters.
Three Huon Class Mine Hunters.

RAN Organisation

Here you will learn how the Royal Australian Navy is structured. You will also learn about the rank and rating system, so you can correctly identify both sailors and other officers. Additionally you will learn about the honours and awards system, as well as the ships and establishments of the RAN.

Various major fleet units at anchor.
Various major fleet units at anchor.

Sea Training Deployment

Similar to NEOC, you will undergo a period of training on board one of the Navy's Major Fleet Units (MFU), for example HMAS Sydney. This is an opporunity for you to become familiar with life on board a ship as well as garnering an understanding of the function of the various ships departments.

Helicopter conducting night operations.
Helicopter conducting night operations.

Security Acquaint Course

This is a one-day course designed to give you an understanding of how security works within the military and, in particular, the RAN.

Trainees in life raft.
Trainees in life raft.

Survival at Sea

A prerequisite for joining the Navy is serving at sea. Therefore it is imperative that you are trained to respond correctly if you need to abandon ship. You will learn how to wear a protective suit, how to correctly enter the water from the side of a ship, how to use the life jackets, how to correctly enter a standard RAN life raft, as well as techniques for attracting the attention of rescuers.