Students from the Underwater Medical Course at HMAS Penguin put through their paces

24 June 2013
Able Seaman Medic Lachlan Cox (left) and Able Seaman Medic David Cusak practice their clinical protocols on the Simulation Mannequin (SIMMAN) who has been programmed with symptoms for a crushed lung as part of their training during the Underwater Medical Course at the Royal Australian Navy Medical School, HMAS Penguin.
Able Seaman Medic Lachlan Cox (left) and Able Seaman Medic David Cusak practice their clinical protocols on the Simulation Mannequin (SIMMAN) who has been programmed with symptoms for a crushed lung as part of their training during the Underwater Medical Course at the Royal Australian Navy Medical School, HMAS Penguin.

Students from the Underwater Medical Course at HMAS Penguin are put through their paces using a simulation mannequin or SIMMAN to demonstrate competencies for clinical protocols.

In the Simulation Centre at the RAN Medical School, Lead Instructor POMED Heath Winter controls SIMMAN using the computer program, adjusting symptoms and vital signs to test trainees ABMEDs David Cusak and Lachlan Cox who have already completed ten weeks of training.

The SIMMAN is able to simulate a range of symptoms including tears, shaking, dilating pupils and bleeding. This high level of realism allows the students to face a large range of medical conditions and procedures in a controlled environment. students being able to perform both basic and advanced clinical procedures as if they were real live patients.

The 14 week-long joint course is run with eight trainees from both the Navy and the Army and incorporates theory and practical aspects.

The Royal Australian Navy Medical School, at HMAS Penguin, incorporates a number of training strategies for its students including simulation. In 2012 the School purchased three simulation mannequins to further enhance its training capabilities.

More imagery is available at http://images.defence.gov.au/S20130429