SM-2 Standard Missile

Standard Missile
Function
Surface to air missile
Manufacturer Raytheon
Power Plant
Dual thrust, solid fuel rocket
Thrust
272 kilograms
Weight 708 kilograms
Diameter
34.3 centimetres
Wingspan
1.08 metres
Length
4.72 metres
Range >166+ kilometres
Speed
>Mach 3
Usage Frigate, Guided Missile (FFG)

The Standard Missile is mounted on the RAN's major combatants. It is a surface-to-air defence weapon with fleet area air defence and ship self defence as its primary mission. It has also demonstrated an extended area air defence projection capability and has a secondary mission as an anti-surface ship missile.

Standard Missile 2 (SM2)

The SM2 missile, which has been earmarked for the Navy’s FFGs under the Defence Capability Review, has been described as the world’s premier surface-to-air defence weapon.

The FFGs Mk 13 launcher and Mk92 fire control system will be modified to fire the SM2.

The SM2 is primarily used for fleet area air defence and ship self defence, but it also has an extended air defence capability and it has a secondary anti-surface ship mission.

The SM2, which is extensively used by the US Navy, has consistently demonstrated its effectiveness against targets from surface ships to helicopters and manned aircraft.

It can also be used against in-coming missiles, from very low to very high altitudes and from stationary to supersonic speeds, under a variety of weather conditions, and across a spectrum of electronic countermeasures environments.

SM2s use tail controls and a solid fuel rocket motor for propulsion and maneuverability, and, in addition, extended range missiles have a booster with thrust vector controls.

The significance of their vastly improved range over the current SM1 is a force multiplier and will deliver significant capability to defend maritime units and forces ashore.


Video: During RIMPAC 2010, the Adelaide class frigate, HMAS Newcastle, launched a SM-2 Standard Missile. Note: Video also covers a Harpoon missile firing and starts at the 55 second mark. Note: This YouTube video will not be viewable on the Defence Protected Network.